Lynne MacLachlan – Jeweller of the month


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CALLING ALL COLOUR LOVERS…

Lynne MacLachlan B+W.jpgThis month we welcome Lynne MacLachlan to lovedazzle. Lynne’s work plays with light, space and colour; vibrant geometric forms reveal ephemeral, shimmering optical patterns, crossing the boundaries of design, art and fashion. She has a passion for experimenting with the latest digital technology, using the latest tools and materials in combination with traditional techniques to find creative applications to intrigue and delight the viewer.

After a degree in  aerospace engineering Lynne returned to education at Duncan of Jordanstone College of Art and Design, Dundee, to study jewellery and metalwork design, which was then followed by a Masters degree at the Royal College of Art.

Her work has been awarded many prizes including gold awards from the Goldsmiths Craft and Design Council, the Scottish International Education Trust Visual Art prize, a Dewar Arts Award to fund her studies at the Royal College of Art and most recently a bursary from the Inches Carr trust.

She has exhibited widely in the UK and Europe, including with the Crafts Council, the Victoria and Albert Museum Dundee, the National Centre for Craft and Design, and London Design Festival, and participated in live projects with Tiffany & Co and Swarovski. Alongside her design work Lynne is currently undertaking a PhD with the Design Transformations group of the Open University, researching  the role of tools in creative designer-maker practice and has been a visiting lecturer at University for the Creative Arts.

Read on for Lynne’s Q & A…

Screen Shot 2017-06-07 at 11.35.24.pngDescribe your work in 3 words?

Sculptural, colourful, super-contemporary

What made you decide to be a jewellery designer?

I was seduced by the metalwork workshop, the idea of actually making something physically, directly with tools and materials really caught my imagination. My obsession with making, experimenting and being inspired by tools began there, although has crossed over to the digital realm.  

Image: Gego Bangles


Screen Shot 2017-06-07 at 11.39.46.pngWho or what has been the biggest influence on your work?

It’s hard to say one person or thing, little bits of influence and inspiration come from so many different places, and becomes combined into your own design and making language, I think that’s where creativity comes from, casting your net widely but recombing all the little bits you like into your own thing. I am privileged to have had a lot of good education, and this is the main thing that got me this far, alongside healthy curiosity and at times some delusions of how difficult some things ended up being!

Image: Klein Pendant & Earrings


Screen Shot 2017-06-07 at 11.44.46.pngIf you weren’t a jewellery designer what do you think you would be?

I think I’m possibly a frustrated architect, I’d love to scale up, but in some ways jewellery is the best bits of architecture, finding beautiful forms to fit the body rather than a site and being closer to the making.

What’s the most exciting piece you have ever made?

I’m currently working on some larger scale pieces for performance after being awarded a bursary by the Inches Carr trust, which I’m very excited about. They will be bigger, more complex and incorporate more dying techniques, watch this space!

Image: Large scale pieces by Lynne from Dundee Design Festival


lynne_maclachlan_-_mondrian_ring_-_blueWhat tool can you not live without?

It’s my computer and 3D software, the potential for new forms still fascinates me, I continue to spend many hours pushing the potential of software tools and little algorithms I make myself to try and discover interesting patterns in the geometric flux.

How do you relax after a day in the studio?

I have two young children, so not that much time to relax really! But we spend time as a family, nice food, nice wine and maybe a quick look in my garden and greenhouse.

Image: Mondrian Ring


Screen Shot 2017-06-07 at 11.54.39.pngIf you could choose anyone to wear your jewellery, who would it be?

I’d love to see my pieces on Tilda Swinton or Bjork, people that really embrace new ideas and create amazing imagery. I’m also proud to say Zaha Hadid once bought one of my rings from a stockist. I really like to see my pieces on all my clients, starting to use 3D printed nylon was partly a decision to offer something striking with an accessible price point in comparison to precious materials. I even have a few male clients who embrace the bold and colourful pieces, which I love as well, I’d like more of these! Image of Bjork from own website


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If you could own a piece by another maker in any discipline, no price limit, what would it be?

I covet many a maker’s work! Currently top of the list is probably one of Heather Woof’s slinky necklaces or something by Emmeline Hastings or Nan Nan Lui, all these jewellers’ attention to detail is amazing and the forms very considered. From other disciplines I love work by Silo Studio, Cody Holt and Ladies and Gentleman Studio, to name just a few, I could write a very long list given the chance!

Image: Necklace by Emmeline Hastings


SHOP LYNNE

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New this month – DeeLyn Walsh


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Go bold this spring with DeeLyn’s tactile, sculptural objects that adorn the body. Her work is often playfully interactive, evoking curiosity and creating a unique connection between object and wearer. Geometric patterns, architectural structure and repetitive forms come together to create a bold wearable collection.

We asked DeeLyn some questions to find out a bit more about her and her jewellery, read on…


DeeLyn WalshDescribe your work in 3 words?
Geometric. Architectural. Sculptural.

What made you decide to be a jewellery designer?
I had a background in woodworking/restoration when I decided to do a design degree in the UK with the intention of focusing on furniture design. I had worked with metal on a much larger scale but when I began the course I was introduced to finer silversmithing and metal-smithing techniques. The process of making this way, combined with the challenge of designing for the body wooed me.


bangle borb_1_72If you weren’t a jewellery designer what do you think you would be?

If i were not a jeweller… Tough one. I’d love to be an architect, but I probably wouldn’t have been one. Maybe something in interior design and/or a professionally organiser. Not sure if that last one exists, but I do LOVE a bit of storage & organisation solutions!

Image: Orbit Bangle – £210


Deelyn commission

What’s the most exciting piece you have ever made?

The renowned jewellery collector, Tuan Lee commissioned a massive neckpiece which could have also been used as body armour. Not including the collar it was 42cm long x 25cm wide and made of hinged silver pyramid components that moved with the body like enlarged fancy chain mail. There was one component which was made from resin and magnetically interchangeable so you could change the colour to your liking.

Image: Commissioned Neckpiece


What tool can you not live without?Screen Shot 2017-04-05 at 12.27.21.png

My Micro-flame welder machine has proven indispensable through the years. My previous collection was recycled materials, including steel, so nothing could go in the acid. The teeny weeny flame from this enabled me to heat just what I needed without causing oxidation on too much off the surrounding area. I use it for as much as possible really.

Image: Earrings made from recycled guitar strings


ring rstra_72How do you relax after a day in the studio?

Relax?… Unfortunately there isn’t much time to relax when balancing work and my 4 year old daughter. I make sure to get home in time to reconnect with her and my husband for a bit before getting her to bed. I try to squeeze some yoga in, but then it’s often back to work. Admin is all the more bearable paired with a nice Rioja!

Image: Strata Angle ring – £160


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If you could choose anyone to wear your jewellery, who would it be?
Bjork! I find pretty much everything about her magical & awe-inspiring, and her style is just so timelessly sublime. She is on your mailing list, right?

Image of Bjork from own website


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If you could own a piece by another maker in any discipline, no price limit, what would it be?
Any Junko Mori piece. Junko was my first maker crush and I still get a little woozy when I see her work.

Image from Mori’s own website

 


DEELYNS BLOG LINK

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Kate Wood – Jeweller of the Month


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This month we welcome Kate Wood to lovedazzle. Kate makes feminine, ethereal jewellery using fine beading and chain work techniques. Using freshwater pearls and tiny faceted gemstones, her beaded designs take their cue from natural forms, growth patterns and textures. Each piece displays a sensuous movement and lightness of touch. We ask Kate some questions to find out a little bit…



What made you decide to be a jewellery designer?

Screen Shot 2017-03-08 at 09.14.26I’ve always enjoyed the process of making things and been attracted to tiny details in objects and the natural world.  I’m mainly self-taught, so it was less a decision to be a jewellery designer and more a gradual realisation that it was a possibility.  After university I worked a museum curator, and started selling jewellery I made in my spare time at weekend markets.  My work developed as I went along, and when I was awarded a studio space at Cockpit Arts in Holborn, having a space of my own combined with business support from the team there really helped me develop my practice.


Screen Shot 2017-03-08 at 11.54.48.pngWho or what has been the biggest influence on your work?

Plant forms and growth patterns are the main influence that seeps into my work although my chainwork pieces are more geometric and inspired by Middle Eastern and Indian jewellery.  I sometimes make some rough sketches, but my main starting point is the materials themselves.  I design by experimenting directly with wire, chain and gemstone and pearl beads, in a time-consuming process of trial and error.  I’m always working towards achieving a harmonious form that moves beautifully on the body.


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If you weren’t a jewellery designer what do you think you would be?

I started out as a museum curator but now I think I’d be a yoga teacher or a garden designer maybe!

Image: Tassel Pendants from £125

 


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What’s the most exciting piece you have ever made?

I’m always most enamoured with the latest piece I’ve made.  At the moment my favourites are the Labradorite Loop Earrings (Image left) as I feel I’ve managed to create a simple, elegant form which is modern, airy and light.  Simplicity is often the hardest thing.


Karl Fritsch rings

 

If you could own a piece by another maker in any discipline, no price limit, what would it be?

I’d love a ring by Karl Fritsch, his work is so beautiful in a brutal kind of way and has a lot of humour to it.
 

 


cate blanchettIf you could choose anyone to wear your jewellery, who would it be?

I think Cate Blanchett would wear it well!  But anyone who loves it and is made happy by it really.

How do you relax after a day in the studio?

Yoga really relaxes and revives me and I love being out in the garden, but after a busy week it could well be a couple of beers and a pizza with something bingeable on Netflix!


Kate Wood shop now

View Kate’s full collection on lovedazzle

 

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Kokkino now on Lovedazzle


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This month we welcome Kokkino to lovedazzle. Melanie Ankers founded Kokkino in 2003 and has continued to make contemporary yet timeless pieces of jewellery in bright silver, warm 24-carat gold and a stunning colour palette of enamels. Striking, sophisticated and yet so wearable, every piece in Kokkino’s collection is lovingly handmade in her Worcester studio.

We ask Melanie a few questions about her work and inspirations, read on to find out more…


kokkinoWhat made you decide to be a jewellery designer?

I have always enjoyed making things, even as a small child I would knit and sew and thought that I would go on to do something related to textiles. It wasn’t until I went to Loughborough College of Art and Design to do my foundation course that I really realised that jewellery design was even possible, and working in a smaller scale making precious things, seemed just perfect.


Who or what have been the biggest influence on your work?kokkino-sketch

I’m not sure there is one particular influence. Much of my work is designed and created by playing with the materials, letting accidents happen, playing with proportions, colour and texture. I keep a sketchbook close by so that when inspiration does strike, I can scribble that down and refer back to the idea later – although it normally morphs into something completely different by the end of the making process!


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If you weren’t a jewellery designer what do you think you would be?

I am not sure what I would be, in my daydreams – maybe a yoga teacher and travel photographer!

Image: Triple Strand Enamel Necklace – £97

 

 


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If you could own any piece by another maker in any discipline, no price limit, what would it be?

I’m so bad at making decisions that it would probably take me months to decide if I could choose any discipline! If I were to choose a piece of jewellery, I love Andrew Lamb’s work. (Image right). The detail, skill and beautiful metal colours are astounding.

 


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If you could choose anyone to wear your jewellery, who would it be and why?

Audrey Tautou. I like her quirky yet elegant style.

 

 


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How do you relax after a day in the studio?

Yoga always helps any aches, pains and worries associated with sitting at a workbench all day, and running a business. I try to do that every day when I finish work.

Image: Silver & Enamel studs Kingfisher Blue – £67


malvern-hills

 

Your top tip for a day out in your area?

A stomp over the Malvern hills is always a great way to blow away the cobwebs and recharge, followed by a cup of tea and a slice of cake!

 

 


View Kokkino’s full collection on lovedazzle

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Dazzle is 35


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tony-and-christineDazzle has been going for 35 years. The first ever Dazzle was conceived by Tony Gordon and Christine Bola in 1981 at the Royal Exchange Theatre, where Christine worked and then at the National Theatre in London and the Bede Art Gallery, Jarrow. Tony ran an art gallery in Manchester at the time. With a shared interest in the arts and Christine’s love of jewellery the first Dazzles were born.

The aim of Dazzle was to introduce the wealth of talented, innovative jewellery designers emerging from colleges at the time, to a wider audience. Over the years we have had thousands of jewellers exhibiting at Dazzle. Some that showed with us in the early days still exhibit with us now.

In the 35 years Dazzle has been going, they have managed to build up quite a collection of jewellery. So this month we delve in to Christine’s jewellery box and pick out her top 20 from the early years to the current day.

Click on the images below to find out about each piece.

You can find out more about Dazzle at www.dazzle-exhibitions.co.uk

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Jeweller of the Month: Gail Klevan


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Gail creates hand-painted acrylic jewellery which refracts dense colour with metallic gold and silver undertones across smooth and sculpted surfaces.These interact with the organic curvature and geometry of the highly polished optical-quality acrylic shapes, creating shimmering, ever changing iridescence.

Gail has exhibited worldwide throughout her established career as a jewellery designer. Starting her training back in 1981 at Manchester Polytechnic were she took her first degree in Wood, Metal and Ceramics. She won a full bursary from the Royal College of Art for a Master’s Degree in Silversmithing and Jewellery, and was awarded her M.A. in 1985. Her degree show contained a range of jewellery, fabrics, furniture and lighting, and while at the college she won the 1983 Bakri Award. Over the years Gail has attracted a large and enthusiastic following, not just in the UK but in many overseas countries too.

We asked Gail a few questions about her and her jewellery, read on to find out more…



What made you decide to be a jewellery designer?

Screen Shot 2016-08-25 at 12.01.58From a very young age I enjoyed making small things.  When I was 4, I used to decorate matchboxes with felts and velvet and braids, and tiny beads and ornaments.  At school I loved art and mostly painted and sculpted. I once made a tooth brush that was taller than me. At college I branched out making furniture and lighting as well as jewellery, but in the end jewellery won out. I am always thrilled when I see the pleasure with which people wear my work and the confidence it gives them, and I love experimenting with shape and colour and pattern. I see myself not just as a jewellery designer, but as an artist. I also make paintings on acrylic, decorate clocks and dishes, and any other item that can be fashioned from acrylic.


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Who or what has been the biggest influence on your work?
I don’t really have a single biggest influence but many people and styles I have encountered along the way have shaped my outlook.   My father painted and my various art teachers all left a mark, but I also take inspiration from nature, from different ethnic traditions, from the ideas of various artistic schools such as art-deco , and in particular the Bakelite jewellery of the 1930’s and the wallpaper and textile designs of the 1950’s.


Screen Shot 2016-08-25 at 14.36.04If you weren’t a jewellery designer what do you think you would be?
I have no idea.  I am well-nigh unemployable and have never worked for anyone else, so maybe I’d be a furniture designer/maker or perhaps a portrait painter.

What’s the most exciting piece you have ever made?
Probably the piece I made for Lesley Craze’s 30th anniversary exhibition – it was a multi coloured articulating necklace with subtly changing colour graduations which changed depending on which angle you looked at it. (image left)


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18ct Gold Cuff by Alison Bradley

If you could own a piece by another maker in any discipline, no price limit, what would it be?
I love Helen Noakes’ work, but Alison Bradley has a stunning solid gold, jewel encrusted cuff-bracelet that I covet.

If you could choose anyone to wear your jewellery, who would it be?
I wouldn’t ask anyone to wear my jewellery who didn’t enjoy it, so don’t have expectations of anyone in particular.  If you are asking who I admire, it’s good-natured people with a smiling countenance, positive outlook and good grace, and a current example of that is Nicola Adams, the Olympic double gold medallist!


Screen Shot 2016-08-24 at 17.49.19.pngWhat do you love most about being a jeweller?
I love the fact that my art can be worn and enjoyed by the wearer.  It always gives me a thrill when people tell me how much they enjoy wearing my work and when I get asked where I get my jewellery.

How do you relax after a day in the studio?
I don’t keep regular hours.  I work from home and work all hours.  I really enjoy my work; it is my relaxation, and my relaxation is my work.

 


View Gail’s full range on lovedazzle

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Grainne Morton – Jeweller of the Month


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Grainne, based in Edinburgh, originally from Northern Ireland, works in a miniature scale, using a diverse range of materials. She incorporates her love of collecting antiques and found objects in her jewellery. Objects are individually set, primarily in silver and arranged together with an emphasis on balance, scale, shape and form. We asked Grainne more about her work and inspirations, with a top tip of a beautiful place to visit in Scotland. Read on…


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What made you decide to be a jewellery designer?
I have always loved making. I realised quite early on that I wanted to go to Art College but had no idea that I would become a jeweller. It was fashion I was was interested in, but when I took jewellery as a student in 1st year at Edinburgh Collage of Art it just clicked. The scale was perfect.

 


Screen Shot 2016-07-26 at 19.24.45Who or what has been the biggest influence on your work?
Probably my family. My parents are both creative and were incredibly encouraging. My aunt is Glass Artist Alison Kinnaird, I grew up being inspired by her practice.

If you weren’t a jewellery designer what do you think you would be?
Who knows? I always wanted to be self employed as that is all I knew.


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What’s the most exciting piece you have ever made?
I made two large scale panels for Royal Carribbean Cruise ships quite early in my career. They were basically giant versions of my Printer Tray brooches. Another was an Alphabet piece – again large scale that I made for the then Scottish Arts Council’s Travelling Gallery. Valerie Singleton was really interested in it when I displayed it at Chelsea Crafts Fair one year but I wanted to keep in in my personal collection. I was really chuffed though.


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If you could own a piece by another maker in any discipline, no price limit, what would it be?
I love clothes. I have have always wanted to get my hands on an original YSL Le Smoking suit. (image right)

If you could choose anyone to wear your jewellery, who would it be?
Chloe Sevigny.

What do you love most about being a jeweller?
As I make everything by hand I love the freedom to be able to design and make exactly what I want.

 


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Blair Castle (image from Great Scotland)

How do you relax after a day in the studio?
With more time in the studio!

If you could recommend a special place to go in Scotland, where would it be?
Blair Atholl. We’re just spent a few days camping up there. It’s a perfect village with streams running through it and little bridges everywhere passing over them. A Mill café that has the most amazing bread, a quirky Country Life Museum, a Castle that displays a great collection of antique jewellery and countryside as green as can be. Beware of the midges though.


View Grainne’s full range on lovedazzle

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